Georgia doesn't have that luxury to replace cheap Russian energy - energy official Narmania

Georgia doesn't have that luxury to replace cheap Russian energy - energy official Narmania

The chairman of the National Energy and Water Supply Regulatory Commission, Davit Narmania, said on Thursday that Georgia “did not have that luxury” to scrap  relatively cheap Russian electricity due to political reasons. However, noting that Georgia had alternative sources.  
He suggested that electricity import was not carried out in Georgia at this stage, since local production was sufficient. 

"Due to the fact that the spring of this year was quite watery and this trend was maintained at the beginning of the summer as well, the electricity generated by our hydroelectric power plants fully meets the demand and there is still excess energy. Accordingly, excess electricity is exported to Turkey. This trend will be maintained in the near future as well,” Narmania said. 

He suggested that in recent years Georgia had imported electricity from Russia, Turkey and Azerbaijan. 

“Volumes and countries vary by month and period. It depends on which country and at what price it is possible to import electricity. As a rule, the choice is made on relatively cheap energy to prevent increase in fees,” Narmania stated. 

He stated that “based on the structure of tariffs, the public sensitivity to prices and the affordability” Georgia “did not have that luxury” to replace Russian electricity.



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The chairman of the National Energy and Water Supply Regulatory Commission, Davit Narmania, said on Thursday that Georgia “did not have that luxury” to scrap  relatively cheap Russian electricity due to political reasons. However, noting that Georgia had alternative sources.  
He suggested that electricity import was not carried out in Georgia at this stage, since local production was sufficient. 

"Due to the fact that the spring of this year was quite watery and this trend was maintained at the beginning of the summer as well, the electricity generated by our hydroelectric power plants fully meets the demand and there is still excess energy. Accordingly, excess electricity is exported to Turkey. This trend will be maintained in the near future as well,” Narmania said. 

He suggested that in recent years Georgia had imported electricity from Russia, Turkey and Azerbaijan. 

“Volumes and countries vary by month and period. It depends on which country and at what price it is possible to import electricity. As a rule, the choice is made on relatively cheap energy to prevent increase in fees,” Narmania stated. 

He stated that “based on the structure of tariffs, the public sensitivity to prices and the affordability” Georgia “did not have that luxury” to replace Russian electricity.